How to Become a Notary in Kentucky

A notary public is an individual commissioned by the state to serve the public as an impartial witness in the taking of acknowledgments, depositions, oaths, and affidavits.

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Introduction

A notary public is an individual commissioned by the state to witness the signing of important documents and administer oaths. Notaries are also sometimes called “notarial officers”, “public notaries”, or simply “notaries”. In Kentucky, any person eighteen (18) years of age or older who resides in the state or is regularly employed in the state may be commissioned as a notary public. Becoming a notary is a relatively simple process that requires completion of an application and payment of a fee.

What is a notary and what do they do?

A notary is a state-commissioned official who witnesses the signing of important documents and verifies the identity of those signing. Notaries also take signatures on affidavits and protest notes. In Kentucky, mobile notaries may travel to a signer’s home, place of business or other location to notarize documents.

Most states require notaries to be at least 18 years old, have no felony convictions and be U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents. Some states also require notaries to pass a written exam on applicable state laws. In Kentucky, you must complete an approved six-hour training class and pass a written exam administered by the Secretary of State’s office.

You must also purchase a surety bond in the amount of $7,500 and submit it with your application for appointment as a notary public. The bond protects consumers against losses incurred due to fraudulent or dishonest acts by the notary. The cost of the bond is typically $50-$100 and is renewable every four years.

Once you are commissioned as a notary, you will be provided with an official seal which must be used on all documents younotarize. You must also keep records of all commissions performed in a journal which must be made available to the public upon request.

The requirements to become a notary in Kentucky

To become a notary public in the state of Kentucky, you must:
-Be at least eighteen (18) years of age.
-Be a resident of Kentucky or have a business in the state.
-Not have been convicted of a felony.
-Complete an approved notary education course.
-Submit a notary application to the Kentucky Secretary of State along with the required fee.
Once you have completed these requirements, you will be issued a commission as a notary public in Kentucky and will be able to perform all duties and responsibilities of the office.

How to become a notary in Kentucky

To become a notary in the state of Kentucky you must:

-Be at least eighteen (18) years old
-A resident of Kentucky or employed in Kentucky
-Have no felony convictions
-Complete an approved training course within one year of commissioning
-Submit a completed application to the Kentucky Secretary of State’s office
-Pay the required fee

The benefits of becoming a notary in Kentucky

Notaries public are impartial witnesses who validate the identity of signers and certify that they are willing and able to sign documents. Depending on the state, notaries may also be allowed to take acknowledgments, administer oaths and affirmations, certify copies of certain documents and perform other duties. In Kentucky, notaries public are commissioned by the Kentucky Secretary of State’s office.

Becoming a notary in Kentucky has several benefits. Notaries are compensated for their services, which can range from a few dollars to over $100 per signature, depending on the type of document being signed. In addition, many employers view being a notary as a positive asset on an employee’s resume. Being a notary can also be a way to give back to your community by providing an important service to those who need it.

To become a notary in Kentucky, you must:
-Be at least 18 years old
-Be a resident of Kentucky or have a valid business address in the state
-Be able to read and write English fluently
-Have no felony convictions
-Submit an application to the Kentucky Secretary of State’s office

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